How Bees and Trees Protect Snow Leopards

One hundred fifty honey bee hives were successfully delivered to their new homes in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan. Relocating the bees was a challenge, as Benazir, our Project Assistant, shares, “The delivery process was so nerve-wracking because we were transporting live creatures over a long distance. The delivery kept getting postponed due to rainy weather. To add to the complexity, honey bee families are supposed to be delivered at night so they can orient themselves once they are settled. Due to the specific challenges and risks involved, we did not sleep for two nights, constantly checking on the location of the truck with the bee families.”

Women and natural resources: how nature, gender and social divisions intersect

To conserve snow leopards and natural resources better, we must understand and identify the important roles that women can – and do – play in local societies. In a recently published paper, Snow Leopard Trust researchers examine the role of women and the nuanced intersection between gender and social divisions in the governance of irrigation water in the Spiti Valley – a critical area for snow leopard conservation.

Women Changing the Face of Conservation

Women play a vital role in all aspects of snow leopard conservation, from being the matriarchs of herding communities, to participating in our Snow Leopard Enterprises handicraft program, to advocacy and research. The impact women have on the protection of this species is immeasurable. We have gathered first hand accounts from the field to share their experiences working in snow leopard conservation.